Wednesday, December 30, 2015

YaYa Prophecy News Watch Headlines - December 28



From: Prophecy News Watch <info@prophecynewswatch.cc>
Sent: Monday, December 28, 2015 1:28:03 PM
To: bigredjbird@hotmail.com
Subject: Prophecy News Watch Headlines - December 28
 
  December 28, 2015
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Biblical Prophecy In The News
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Prophecy News Headlines

Where Is The US In Bible Prophecy?
Terror Analyst: ISIS Jihadis Could 'Cripple America'

"If ISIS or another Islamic terror group gets their hands on a weapon of mass destruction, which they are working diligently to acquire, they might not be able to take down the whole country, but they can take out New York, Washington, Chicago or L.A. That's not alarmism. That's not fear tactics. That's a fact," ...... Click here for full story

Christian Worldview/Issues
No Religious Preference For Refugees? 31 Christians VS. 2,000 Muslims

Christians continue to be the most persecuted religious people in the world this Christmas, but they don't figure to get much help from Western governments in Washington, London or Brussels. Despite President Obama's recent comment that it would be un-American to apply a "religious test" for refugees seeking a safe haven in the United States, it appears his administration has already applied such a test..... Click here for full story

Israel: God's Timepiece
Empty Threats Or The Next Conflict? - ISIS Threatens Israel

After 7 months of silence, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, ISIS's secretive leader has released an audio recording on social media to bolster his followers following several weeks of setbacks. The speech is clearly an attempt to boost spirits by focusing on the one country that seems to ignite deep passion in the spirits of every Muslim - Israel........ Click here for full story

Christian Worldview/Issues
Guns In Church? FEMA Helps Churches Prepare For 'Active Shooter Incidents'

If Islamic terrorists were to even just hit one or two of our churches, attendance all across America would immediately plummet. Nobody wants to feel like they are taking their family to a place of danger, and so that is the power of random attacks like the ones that we recently witnessed in Paris. If terrorists can make us feel that they could strike anywhere and at any time, the panic and fear that will create will fundamentally change the way that we go about doing things...... Click here for full story

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Saturday, December 26, 2015

Best children's books of the year, how Earth's most alien creature illuminates the wonders of consciousness, love and loss via hawk, and more



On Sunday, December 20, 2015 9:03 AM, Brain Pickings Weekly <newsletter@brainpickings.org> wrote:


The best children's books of the year, how Earth's most alien creature illuminates the wonders of consciousness, love and loss via hawk, and more
The best children's books of the year, what a hawk can teach us about love, loss, control, and surrender, how Earth's most alien creature illuminates the wonders of consciousness, and more. Email not displaying correctly?
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Bruce Lee on Self-Actualization and the Crucial Difference Between Pride and Self-Esteem

"The less promise and potency in the self, the more imperative is the need for pride. The core of pride is self-rejection."

A Year Without Mom: A Gorgeous Graphic Novel About Separation and Reunion, the End of Childhood, and the Tradeoffs of Happiness

From the universals of first love to the complexities of geopolitical history, a tender tale of becoming.

Marilynne Robinson on the Humanities, the Limits of Neuroscience, and the Usefulness of the Soul as a Sensemaking Mechanism for Reality

"A great deal depends, perhaps our humanity depends, on our sensing and acknowledging that quality in our kind we call the soul."

The Outsider with the Public Voice: How Joan Didion Mirrored Us Back to Ourselves

"From the first, her work insisted that a single life contained the life of our times."

A Different Kind of Progress: The Poetry and Philosophy of Rilke, Rumi, Mary Oliver, and Tagore, Set to Song

A beautiful musical homage to the eternal dance of life and death.

Jane Austen's Advice on Love, Marriage, and How to Rebuff a Suitor with Clarity and Kindness

"Anything is to be preferred or endured rather than marrying without affection."

Henry Beston on Whimsicality, the Limits of Knowledge, and What Science Is and Isn't

"A world without wonder, and a way of mind without wonder, becomes a world without imagination, and without imagination man is a poor and stunted creature."

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WelcomeHello, Terry Travers! If you missed last week's edition – the best science books of 2015, the best art books of 2015, Nikki Giovanni's wonderful poems celebrating libraries and librarians, and more – you can catch up right here. And if you're enjoying this, please consider supporting this labor of love with a donation – I spent thousands of hours and tremendous resources on it this year, and every little bit of support helps more than you can imagine.

How a Hawk Clarifies Love and Loss, Beauty and Terror, Control and Surrender

Every once in a while — perhaps thrice a lifetime, if one is lucky — a book comes along so immensely and intricately insightful, so overwhelming in beauty, that it renders one incapable of articulating what it's about without contracting its expansive complexity, flattening its dimensional richness, and stripping it of its splendor. Because it is, of course, about everything — it might take a specific something as its subject, but its object is nothing less than the whole of the human spirit, mirrored back to itself.
H Is for Hawk (public library) by Helen Macdonald is one such book — the kind one devours voraciously, then picks up and puts down repeatedly, unsure how to channel its aboutness in a way that isn't woefully inadequate.
For a necessary starting point, here's an inadequate summation: After her father's sudden and soul-splitting death, Macdonald, a seasoned falconer, decides to wade through the devastation by learning to train a goshawk — the fiercest of raptors, "things of death and difficulty: spooky, pale-eyed psychopaths," capable of inflicting absolute gore with absolute grace. Over the course of that trying experience — which she chronicles by weaving together personal memory, natural history (the memory of our planet), and literary history (the memory of our culture) — she learns about love and loss, beauty and terror, control and surrender, and the myriad other dualities reconciling which is the game of life.
British goshawk by Archibald Thorburn, 1915 (public domain)
Macdonald writes:
Here's a word. Bereavement. Or, Bereaved. Bereft. It's from the Old English bereafian, meaning 'to deprive of, take away, seize, rob.' Robbed. Seized. It happens to everyone. But you feel it alone. Shocking loss isn't to be shared, no matter how hard you try.
Out of that aloneness a singular and paradoxical madness is born:
I knew I wasn't mad mad because I'd seen people in the grip of psychosis before, and that was madness as obvious as the taste of blood in the mouth. The kind of madness I had was different. It was quiet, and very, very dangerous. It was a madness designed to keep me sane. My mind struggled to build across the gap, make a new and inhabitable world… Time didn't run forwards any more. It was a solid thing you could press yourself against and feel it push back; a thick fluid, half-air, half-glass, that flowed both ways and sent ripples of recollection forwards and new events backwards so that new things I encountered, then, seemed souvenirs from the distant past.
Rippling through Macdonald's fluid, mesmerizingly immersive prose are piercing, short, perfectly placed deliverances, in both senses of the word: there is the dark ("What happens to the mind after bereavement makes no sense until later."), the luminous ("I'd halfway forgotten how kind and warm the world could be."), the immediate ("Time passed. The wavelength of the light around me shortened. The day built itself."), the timeless ("Those old ghostly intuitions that have tied sinew and soul together for millennia."), and the irrepressibly sublime ("Looking for goshawks is like looking for grace: it comes, but not often, and you don't get to say when or how.").
American goshawk by Robert Ridgway, 1893 (public domain)
Choosing a goshawk, a creature notoriously difficult to tame, became Macdonald's way of learning to let grace come unbidden, a letting that demanded a letting go — of compulsive problem-solving, of the various control strategies by which we try to bend life to our will, of the countless self-contortion and self-flagellation techniques driving the machinery of our striving. Recounts the frustration of failing to get her goshawk, Mabel, to obey her commands — frustration familiar to anyone who has ever anguished by any form of unrequited intentionality — Macdonald writes:
I flew her later in the day. I flew her earlier. I fed her rabbit with fur and rabbit without. I fed her chicks that I'd gutted and skinned and rinsed in water. I reduced her weight. I raised it. I reduced it again. I wore different clothes. I tried everything to fix the problem, certain that the problem couldn't be fixed because the problem was me. Sometimes she flew straight to my fist, sometimes straight over it, and there was no way of knowing which it would be. Every flight was a monstrous game of chance, a coin-toss, and what was at stake felt something very like my soul. I began to think that what made the hawk flinch from me was the same thing that had driven away the man I'd fallen for after my father's death. Think that there was something deeply wrong about me, something vile that only he and the hawk could see.
Macdonald peers directly into the black hole of fury, a familiar rage directed as much at the rebuffer as at the rebuffed self:
The anger was vast and it came out of nowhere. It was the rage of something not fitting; the frustration of trying to put something in a box that is slightly too small. You try moving the shape around in the hope that some angle will make it fit in the box. Slowly comes an apprehension that this might not, after all, be possible. And finally you know it won't fit, know there is no way it can fit, but this doesn't stop you using brute force to try to crush it in, punishing the bloody thing for not fitting properly. That was what it was like: but I was the box, I was the thing that didn't fit, and I was the person smashing it, over and over again, with bruised and bleeding hands.
And yet somehow, Macdonald unboxes herself as she trains Mabel into control and Mabel trains her into the grace of surrender, of resting into life exactly as it is rather than striving for some continually unsatisfying and anguishing version of how it ought to be. She captures this beautifully in the closing vignette — an earthquake, quite an uncommon occurrence in England, rattles her house and sends her panic-stricken into Mabel's quarters, terrified at the thought that earthquakes alarm wildlife and often cause animals to flee. Macdonald writes:
I race downstairs, three steps at a time, burst through the door and turn on the light in her room. She is asleep. She wakes, pulls her head from her mantle-feathers and looks at me with clear eyes. She's surprised to see me. She yawns, showing her pink mouth like a cat's and its arrowhead tongue with its black tip. Her creamy underparts are draped right down over her feet, so only one lemony toe and one carbon-black talon are exposed. Her other foot is drawn high up at her chest. She felt the tremors. And then she went back to sleep, entirely unmoved by the moving earth. The quake brought no panic, no fear, no sense of wrongness to her at all. She's at home in the world. She's here. She ducks her head upside down, pleased to see me, shakes her feathers into a fluffy mop of contentment, and then, as I sit with her, she slowly closes her eyes, tucks her head back into her feathers, and sleeps. She is not a duke, a cardinal, a hieroglyph or a mythological beast, but right now Mabel is more than a hawk. She feels like a protecting spirit. My little household god. Some things happen only once, twice in a lifetime. The world is full of signs and wonders that come, and go, and if you are lucky you might be alive to see them. I had thought the world was ending, but my hawk had saved me again, and all the terror was gone.
H Is for Hawk is an unsummarizably spectacular read in its totality, the kind that lodges itself in your mind, heart, and spirit with equal gravity and grace. Complement it with these gorgeous 19th-century drawings of raptors, then revisit Sy Montgomery on how an octopus illuminates the wonders of consciousness and Maira Kalman on what a dog taught her about the meaning of human life.

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The Best Children's Books of 2015

"I don't write for children," Maurice Sendak scoffed in his final interview. "I write — and somebody says, 'That's for children!'" Some generations earlier, J.R.R. Tolkien vehemently asserted that there is no such thing as writing "for children" and C.S. Lewis cautioned against treating children as a different species, while E.B. White saw them as "the most attentive, curious, eager, observant, sensitive, quick, and generally congenial readers" among our own species.
With this lens, on the heels of the year's best science books and best art books, here are the year's most intelligent and imaginative books published "for children" but immeasurably rewarding for all readers.
1. ENORMOUS SMALLNESS
"In a Cummings poem," Susan Cheever wrote in her spectacular biography of E. E. Cummings, "the reader must often pick his way toward comprehension, which comes, when it does, in a burst of delight and recognition." Such a burst is what rewards the reader, whatever his or her age, in Enormous Smallness: A Story of E. E. Cummings (public library) — an uncommonly delightful picture-book celebration of Cummings's life by Brooklyn-based poet Matthew Burgess, illustrated by Kris Di Giacomo (the artist behind the wonderful alphabet book Take Away the A).
To reimagine the beloved poet's life in a tango of word and image is quite befitting — unbeknownst to many, Cummings had a passion for drawing and once described himself as "an author of pictures, a draughtsman of words."
The project comes from Brooklyn-based indie powerhouse Enchanted Lion Books — publisher of some of the most daring and tender children's books of our time — and was first envisioned by ELB founder Claudia Zoe Bedrick, who approached Burgess about writing a children's biography of Cummings. Miraculously, Burgess had visited Cummings's home at 4 Patchin Place in New York City three years earlier, after a serendipitous encounter with the current resident — an experience that had planted a seed of quietly germinating obsession with the legendary poet's life.
And so the collaboration stretched between them, as Cummings might say, like "a pleasant song" — Burgess and Bedrick worked side by side for four years to bring this wonder of a book to life.
The story begins with Cummings, already known as "E. E." and living in his New York City home where he spent the last forty years of his life, typing away as the love of his life, the fashion model and photographer Marion Moorehouse, summons him to tea-time with an elephant-shaped bell.
From there, Burgess takes the reader on an affectionate biographical detective story, tracing how Edward Estlin became E. E., what brought him to Manhattan from his native Cambridge, and how elephants (and trees, and birds) became his lifelong creative companions in the circus of his imagination.
Young Estlin's first poem "poured out of his mouth when he was only three."
With the loving support of the unsung champions with whom the history of creative culture is strewn — the mother who began recording his spontaneous recitations in a little book titled "Estlin's Original Poems"; the father who stomped on his hands and knees, play-pretending into existence the mighty elephant that was little Estlin's creative muse; the teacher who encouraged him to pursue his love of words; the uncle who gave him a book on how to write poetry — he eventually made it to Harvard.
There, he came upon the words of his favorite poet, John Keats — "I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the Heart's affections and the truth of the Imagination" — which awakened young Estlin's creative courage. After graduation, he began experimenting with poetry and moved to New York City, falling in love with its "irresistibly stupendous newness."
But then World War I struck and Estlin went to France, volunteering as an ambulance-driver. While working in the French countryside, he was mistaken for a spy and sent to prison for several months.
When the war ended, he wrote a book about his experience, titled The Enormous Room. Estlin was reborn as E. E.
The following year, he published his first book of poems, Tulips & Chimneys.
Burgess writes:
Using a style all his own,
e. e. put lowercase letters where capitals normally go,
and his playful punctuation grabbed readers' attention.
His poems were alive with experimentation
and surprise!
And because of his love for lowercase letters,
his name began to appear with two little e's (& a little c, too).
But his expansive experimentation was too much for the small-minded literary pantheon:
Some people criticized him for painting with words.
Other said his poems were
too strange
too small.
Some said they were
no good at all.
And yet Cummings, who viewed society's criteria for what it means to be a successful artist with mischievous wryness, was undeterred. A century before Neil Gaiman's memorable advice that the artist's only appropriate response to criticism is to make good art, Cummings embodied this ethos. Burgess captures this spirit with quiet elegance, weaving one of Cummings's poems into the story:
But no matter what the world was giving or taking,
E. E. went right on dreaming and making.
For inside, he knew his poems were new and true.
love is a place
love is a place
& through this place of
love move
(with brightness of peace)
all places
yes is a world
& in this world of
yes live
(skillfully curled)
all worlds.
His poems were his way
of saying YES.
YES to the heart
and the roundness of the moon,
to birds, elephants, trees,
and everything he loved.
YES to spring, too
which always brought him back
to childhood, when the first
sign of his favorite season
was the whistling arrival
of the balloon man.
The book's epigraph is a celebration of this unflinching yes-saying: "It takes courage to grow up and become who you really are."
See more here.
2. LOUIS I, KING OF THE SHEEP
"Never be hard upon people who are in your power," Charles Dickens counseled in a letter of advice to his young son. And yet power has a way of calling forth the hardest and most unhandsome edges of human nature — something John F. Kennedy observed in his spectacular eulogy to Robert Frost, lamenting that power "leads men towards arrogance" and "narrows the areas of man's concern." Redemption, he argued, is only possible when we recognize that "what counts is the way power is used — whether with swagger and contempt, or with prudence, discipline and magnanimity."
It's a difficult lesson to impart even on the most intelligent and receptive of grownups, and one especially crucial in planting the seeds of good personhood in childhood, when we first brush with power dynamics in ways so real and raw that they can imprint us for life.
That's what French illustrator Olivier Tallec accomplishes with extraordinary humor, sensitivity, and warmth in Louis I, King of the Sheep (public library) — one of the loveliest children's books I've ever encountered.
Inspired by watching children tussle with power on the playground, it tells the story of a humble sheep named Louis who becomes self-appointed king after a fickle gust of wind deposits a royal crown at his feet.
As Louis I rises to power by nothing more than chance, he gradually transmogrifies into an entitled and arrogant tyrant — a woefully familiar behavioral pattern calling to mind the legendary Stanford Prison Experiment, that cornerstone of social psychology in which students were randomly assigned to be either prison guards or prisoners in a mock-jail and the "guards" proceeded to exploit their randomly assigned power to a point of devastating inhumanity.
Intoxicated with his newfound authority, Louis I goes on to find himself a throne "from which to hand down justice," begins addressing the people, and embarks upon such royal activities as hunting — even for lions.
Eventually, he becomes so drunk on power that he decides he must bring order to his dominion by driving out all sheep who don't resemble him — perhaps Tallec's subtle invitation to parents to teach kids about the Holocaust, that darkest of episodes in the history of human nature, undergirded by the very same atrocious impulses.
And then, just like that, another fickle gust of wind takes the crown away.
See more here.
3. SIDEWALK FLOWERS
"How we spend our days, of course, is how we spend our lives," Annie Dillard wrote in her magnificent defense of living with presence. But in our age of productivity, we spend our days running away from boredom, never mind its creative and spiritual benefits, and toward maximum efficiency. Under the tyranny of multitasking, the unitasking necessary for the art of noticing has been exiled from our daily lives. And yet, as we grow increasingly disillusioned with the notion of "work/life balance," something in our modern souls is aching for the resuscitation of this dying capacity for presence. That capacity is especially essential in parenting, where the cultural trope of the device-distracted parent is an increasingly disquieting pandemic.
Half a century after Ruth Krauss wrote, and Maurice Sendak illustrated, one of the loveliest lines in the history of children's books — "Everybody should be quiet near a little stream and listen." — poet JonArno Lawson and illustrator Sydney Smith team up on a magnificent modern manifesto for the everyday art of noticing in a culture that rips the soul asunder with the dual demands of distraction and efficiency.
Sidewalk Flowers (public library) tells the wordless story of a little girl on her way home with her device-distracted father, a contemporary Little Red Riding Hood walking through the urban forest. Along the way, she collects wildflowers and leaves them as silent gifts for her fellow participants in this pulsating mystery we call life — the homeless man sleeping on a park bench, the sparrow having completed its earthly hours, the neighbor's dog and, finally, her mother's and brothers' hair.
The flowers become at once an act of noticing and a gift of being noticed, a sacred bestowing of attention with which the child beckons her father's absentee mind back to mindful presence.
See more here.
4. THE LITTLE GARDENER
The Little Gardener (public library) by Hawaiian-born, British-based illustrator Emily Hughes comes on the heels and in the spirit of her wondrous debut, Wild — one of the best children's books of 2014.
Here, Hughes tells the story of a tiny boy, no larger than a thumb, and his garden. The charming, immeasurably sweet tale calls to mind what Van Gogh wrote to his brother: "Whosoever loves much performs much, and can accomplish much, and what is done in love is well done!" It is at heart a parable of purpose — tender assurance for anyone who has ever undertaken a labor of love against seemingly insurmountable odds and persevered through hardship, continuing to nourishing that labor until the love emanates out, becomes contagious, and draws in kindred spirits as a centripetal force of shared purpose and enthusiasm.
Hughes's illustrations, vibrant and deeply alive, capture that strange tapestry of tenderness and wilderness of which the human soul is woven.
This was the garden.
It didn't look like much, but it meant everything to its gardener.
It was his home. It was his supper.
It was his joy.
But the little gardener, joyful and hardworking as he is, isn't "much good at gardening," for he is "just too little" — a beautiful metaphor for that feeling familiar to any artist and entrepreneur at the outset of a creative project, that sense of smallness in the face of a seemingly enormous endeavor, that moment where humility and faith must converge in order for one to surmount the mental barrier and march forward.
Mismatch of task and capability notwithstanding, the little gardener's hard work pays off and one thing does blossom.
It was a flower.
It was alive and wonderful.
It gave the gardener hope and made him want to work even harder.
And so he does — he toils day and night, tirelessly tending to his jungle of a garden.
Even so, it begins to perish, his home, his supper, and his joy all at stake.
One particularly hopeless night, the little gardener peers out the window of his tiny straw hut and sends a single wish into the night sky — he wished that he could have some help, so his beloved garden would be saved.
No one heard his little voice, but someone saw his flower.
It was alive and wonderful.
It gave the someone hope.
It made the someone want to work harder.
As he blows his wish into the cosmos with a heavy heart, the little gardner drifts into sleep just as heavy — he sleeps a whole day, a whole week, a whole month. But, meanwhile, the Gulliveresque girl enchanted by that single flower — the little gardener's sole labor of love — begins tending to the whole garden.
By the time the little gardener awakens, the garden is transformed into a blooming wonderland, nurtured by the largeness of a contagious love the seed for which he had planted in the heart of another.
This is the garden now.
And this is its gardener.
He doesn't look like much,
but he means everything to his garden.
See more here.
6. THE TIGER WHO WOULD BE KING
"Power narrows the areas of man's concern," John F. Kennedy asserted in one of the greatest speeches of all time, adding: "What counts is the way power is used — whether with swagger and contempt, or with prudence, discipline and magnanimity. What counts is the purpose for which power is used — whether for aggrandizement or for liberation." A century earlier, Nietzsche admonished against the self-aggrandizement aspect of power as he contemplated the fine line between constructive and destructive rebellion. But no one has addressed the ego's blind lust for power with starker simplicity and more acuity of sentiment than beloved humorist and cartoonist James Thurber (December 8, 1894–November 2, 1961).
In 1927, the year his friend E.B. White helped him join the staff of the New Yorker for what would become a decades-long editorial relationship, young Thurber penned a short and piercing fable about a power-hungry tiger who sets out to become the king of beasts and ends up decimating the jungle into a subjectless dominion — a timeless text of penetrating timeliness amid our culture of mindless violence, too often punctuated by protest for protest's sake and destructive rather than constructive rebellion.
Nearly a century later, illustrator and printmaker JooHee Yoon — the talent behind Beastly Verse, one of the best art books of the year — brings the Thurber classic to breathtaking new life in the stunning picture-book The Tiger Who Would Be King (public library).
Yoon, creator of the immeasurably wonderful Beastly Verse, enlists her mastery of early printmaking techniques in amplifying the dramatic vibrancy of the story, which she tells in only two colors layered over the hearty white paper to create a stunning interplay of light and shadow, stillness and brutality.
One morning the tiger woke up in the jungle and told his mate that he was king of beasts.
"Leo, the lion, is king of beasts," she said.
"We need a change," said the tiger. "The creatures are crying for change."
The tigress listened but she could hear no crying, except that of her cubs.
So drunk does the tiger become on his obsession with omnipotence that he holds back no delusion:
"I'll be king of beasts by the time the moon rises," said the tiger. "It will be a yellow moon with black stripes, in my honor."
"Oh, sure," said the tigress as she went to look after her young, one of whom, a male, very like his father, had got an imaginary thorn in his paw.
Undergirding the story is a subtle subversion of gender stereotypes — the kind perpetuated by Disney in the same era, painting women as irrationally emotional and men as governed by cool reason. Thurber, whose cartoons frequently depicted women in calm control, casts his tigress as the lucid counterpoint to the masculine energy of baseless ego-driven violence.
But despite his mate's refutations, the tiger makes his way to the lion's den, where the lioness announces the belligerent visitor to her mate.
"The king is here to see you," she said.
"What king?" he inquired, sleepily.
"The king of beasts," she said.
"I am the king of beasts," roared Leo, and he charged out of the den to defend his crown against the pretender.
A terrible brawl ensues and electrifies the jungle until sundown.
All the animals of the jungle joined in, some taking the side of the tiger and others the side of the lion. Every creature from the aardvark to the zebra took part in the struggle to overthrow the lion or to repulse the tiger, and some did not know which they were fighting for, and some fought for both, and some fought whoever was nearest, and some fought for the sake of fighting.
Thurber delivers his punchline, dark and delightful in its darkness:
When the moon rose, fevered and gibbous, it shone upon a jungle in which nothing stirred except a macaw and a cockatoo, screaming in horror.
All the beasts were dead except the tiger, and his days were numbered and his time was ticking away. He was monarch of all he surveyed, but it didn't seem to mean anything.
MORAL: You can't very well be king of beasts if there aren't any.
See more here.
7. POOL
A century and a half after Lewis Carroll plunged his Alice into a fantastical world through the looking-glass, South Korean fine artist and illustrator JiHyeon Lee offers a magnificent modern counterpart in her picture-book debut, Pool (public library) — a wordless masterpiece of space, scale, and silence converging to create an underwater world of wonder just beneath the reflective surface of ordinary life.
Lee's delicate yet immensely expressive pencil illustrations, partway between Sophie Blackall and mid-career Maurice Sendak, emanate childhood's tender trepidations and the gentle playfulness at the heart of the story.
We meet a boy standing poolside, looking reluctantly at the boisterous crowd lurching into the annual invasion of the public pool — a noisy, chaotic scene Lee communicates with great subtlety and quietude.
Perched on an uncrowded corner of the pool, the boy hesitantly contemplates the prospect of plunging.
At last, he takes the leap and dives below the superficial clamor of the crowd, where he encounters his unexpected counterpart — a little girl propelled by the same shy curiosity.
Together, they dive even deeper and the pool suddenly transmogrifies into a whimsical underwater wonderland full of strange and beautiful creatures — a magical mashup of the ocean's most glorious real-life inhabitants, the mythological marine deities of ancient folklore, and Borges's imaginary beings.
Suddenly, they come upon a most magnificent sight.
With a mastery of pacing time through negative space, calling to mind Marianne Dubuc's exquisite The Lion and the Bird, Lee paints a visual gasp as the two children find themselves facing a gentle giant — a peculiar being reminiscent of our planet's largest real creature (the subject of another spectacular picture-book), only white and furry.
They peer into its giant eye, into its enormous otherness, not with fear but with affectionate awe — a sweet and subtle reminder that, as Neil Gaiman memorably put it, "behind every pair of eyes, there's somebody like us."
As the two make their way back to the surface, that watery looking-glass through which they had plunged into a modern-day Wonderland, they exit the pool from the other end, somehow transformed; the clamorous crowd, having completed this annual chore, leaves the same way it had flounced in.
And then, as they take off their goggles, they peer into each other's naked eyes to find in the otherness an affectionate sameness of spirit peering back.
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9. LEO: A GHOST STORY
"Death is our friend precisely because it brings us into absolute and passionate presence with all that is here, that is natural, that is love," Rilke wrote in contemplating how mortality expands our aliveness. That, perhaps, is why ghost tales are among the most universal and perennial fixtures of all mythologies and storytelling traditions — the very notion of a ghost welcomes a point of presence with life and death simultaneously. That most such stories cast ghosts as fearsome speaks to our lamentable tendency to approach the unfamiliar and the unknown — death, of course, being the ultimate unknown — with fear rather than with openminded, openhearted curiosity. Rilke knew this, writing in a letter that "fear of the unexplainable has not only impoverished our inner lives, but also diminished relations between people." A generation later, Ana├»s Nin observed that "it is a sign of great inner insecurity to be hostile to the unfamiliar."
In Leo: A Ghost Story (public library), beloved children's book author Mac Barnett and illustrator Christian Robinson subvert the many dimensions of this human tendency in a heartening parable of seeing through difference, meeting the unfamiliar with unflinching friendliness, and dignifying the reality of the other.
We meet little Leo, a warmhearted ghost who has been living in a great old house on the edge of the city for many years, spending his days reading and drawing.
But his bibliophilic idyll changes the day a new family buys the house and moves in.
At first excited for the company and eager to be "a good ghost," Leo tries to welcome them by making mint tea and honey toast.
But the mysterious treats alarm the family and send them running for help, eventually enlisting "a scientist, a clergyman, and a psychic to get rid of the ghost."
Disheartened by being this unwelcome in his own home, Leo decides to try living as a roaming ghost and heads to the city.
Leo saw the city and the people who lived there.
Nobody saw Leo.
Disoriented by the urban chaos, he tries to ask the policewoman for directions — but she walks right through him.
At last, Leo meets a little named Jane. Miraculously, Jane — who we're told is wearing a crown — sees Leo and invites him to play Knights of the Round Table, then promptly knights him and introduces her to her imaginary friends at the roundtable.
But we never see the crown — a subtle bow before the mutual dignity of recognition, for Leo, too, sees something in Jane that others don't.
When Jane's mother beckons her back home, Leo is delighted to have met someone who could see him, but his heart sinks upon realizing that Jane perceives him as another imaginary friend, once again having his reality yanked away from him.
Still, the two reconvene after dinner for another playdate of slaying imaginary dragons with their make-believe swords. But just as they retire for bedtime, Leo hears rustling — it's a burglar sneaking through the window.
He, too, walks right through Leo, despite the boy's protective protestations.
Suddenly, Leo gets an idea — he tosses a bed sheet over himself and flies at the thief, startling him and causing him to drop the silverware, then chasing him into the main closet and locking him in until the police arrives.
"Later Leo would not be able to say where the idea came from," writes Barnett — another wink at subverting cultural tropes and using them to one's advantage, for the idea came, of course, from the familiar depiction of the ghost as a sheet-draped invisible presence. One can't help but appreciate this wonderfully subtle reminder that children absorb the countless ideas permeating our culture. The positive manifestation of this is the creative act itself — we create by borrowing and combining ideas we've accumulated by the very act of being alive and attentive to the world. The negative manifestation is how stereotypes proliferate, planting seeds for ideas that seem to come out of nowhere, germinating our unconscious social biases.
The story offers a magnificent counterpoint to precisely this proliferation. In a cultural landscape where only 3% of children's books feature characters of color and many continue to purvey limiting gender stereotypes, here's a story where a little black girl is the knight in shining armor, the one who confers power and dignity upon Leo's reality, and where a woman cop catches the bad guy in the end. It's also a story that treats the difficult subject of...

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The Soul of an Octopus: How One of Earth's Most Alien Creatures Illuminates the Wonders of Consciousness

"Despite centuries of investigation by everyone from natural historians, psychologists, and psychiatrists, to ethicists, neuroscientists, and philosophers, there is still no universal definition of emotion or consciousness," Laurel Braitman wrote in her terrific exploration of the mental lives of animals. Virginia Woolf defined consciousness as "a wave in the mind," but even if we're able to ride the wave, we hardly know the ocean out of which it arises.
During my annual visit to NPR's Science Friday to discuss my choices for the year's best science books, my co-guest — science writer extraordinaire Deborah Blum — mentioned a fascinating book that had slipped my readerly tentacles, one that addresses this abiding question of consciousness with unparalleled rigor and grace: The Soul of an Octopus: A Surprising Exploration into the Wonder of Consciousness (public library) by naturalist, writer, and documentary filmmaker Sy Montgomery.
Montgomery begins with a seemingly simple premise. The octopus is a creature magnificently dissimilar to us — it can change shape and color, tastes with its skin, has its mouth in its armpit, and is capable of squeezing its entire body through a hole the size of an apple. And since we humans experience reality in profoundly different ways from one another, based on our individual consciousnesses, then the octopus must be inhabiting an altogether different version of what we call reality.
The constellation of complexities comprising this difference, Montgomery reveals over the course of this miraculously insightful and enchanting book, expands our understanding of consciousness and sheds light on the very notion of what we call a "soul."
North Pacific Giant Octopus by photographer Mark Laita from his project Sea
She writes:
More than half a billion years ago, the lineage that would lead to octopuses and the one leading to humans separated. Was it possible, I wondered, to reach another mind on the other side of that divide? Octopuses represent the great mystery of the Other.
Among the pitfalls of the human condition is our tendency to see otherness as a source of dread rather than an invitation to friendly curiosity. The octopus, as the ultimate Other, has a long history of epitomizing this inclination and sparking our primal fear of the unknown. Montgomery cites one particularly emblematic depiction from Victor Hugo's novel Toilers of the Sea:
The spectre lies upon you; the tiger can only devour you; the devil-fish, horrible, sucks your life-blood away… The muscles swell, the fibres of the body are contorted, the skin cracks under the loathsome oppression, the blood spurts out and mingles horribly with the lymph of the monster, which clings to the victim with innumerable hideous mouths…
Setting out to "defend the octopus against centuries of character assassination," Montgomery notes that octopuses have highly individual personalities and can exhibit marked curiosity — faculties we tend to think of as singularly human. Even their motives for friendliness and unfriendliness, far from the baseless brutality of depictions like Hugo's, parallel our own:
In one study, Seattle Aquarium biologist Roland Anderson exposed eight giant Pacific octopuses to two unfamiliar humans, dressed identically in blue aquarium uniforms. One person consistently fed a particular octopus, and another always touched it with a bristly stick. Within a week, at first sight of the people — looking up at them through the water, without even touching or tasting them — most of the octopuses moved toward the feeder and away from the irritator. Sometimes the octopus would aim its water-shooting funnel, the siphon near the side of the head with which an octopus jets through the sea, at the person who had touched it with the bristly stick.
Surely, a skeptic might argue that this is more instinct than "consciousness." But Montgomery goes on to outline a number of strikingly specific and context-considered behaviors indicating that octopuses are animated by complex conscious experiences — things we tend to term "thoughts" and "feelings" in the human realm — that upend our delusions of exceptionalism. Lest we forget, we have a long history of bolstering those delusions by putting other species down, much like petty egotists try to make themselves feel big by making other people feel small — even Jane Goodall contended with dismissal and ridicule when she first suggested that chimpanzees have consciousness.
Pacific giant octopus by photographer Susan Middleton from her project Spineless
But beyond intellectual considerations of this weird and wonderful creature's inner life, Montgomery points to the physical, bodily presence with an octopus as a transcendent experience in its own right — one that pulls into question our most basic assumptions about consciousness:
While stroking an octopus, it is easy to fall into reverie. To share such a moment of deep tranquility with another being, especially one as different from us as the octopus, is a humbling privilege. It's a shared sweetness, a gentle miracle, an uplink to universal consciousness.
Indeed, the book's greatest reward isn't the fascinating science — although that is riveting and ablaze with rigor — but Montgomery's bewitching prose, pouring from the soul of a literary naturalist who paints the marvels of the ocean's depths like Thoreau did the marvels of the New England woods. Finding herself "drunk with strange splendors" as she beholds the marine world's "parade of wonders," Montgomery writes:
A splendid toadfish hides beneath a rock. Once thought to live only in Cozumel, it's pancake flat, with thin, wavy, horizontal blue and white stripes, Day-Glo yellow fins, and whiskery barbels. A four-foot nurse shark sleeps beneath a coral shelf, peaceful as a prayer. A trumpet fish, yellow with dark stripes, floats with its long, tubular snout down, trying to blend in with some branching coral… A school of iridescent pink and yellow fish slide by inches from our masks, then wheel in unison like birds in the sky.
I have known no natural state more like a dream than this. I feel elation cresting into ecstasy and experience bizarre sensations: my own breath resonates in my skull, faraway sounds thump in my chest, objects appear closer and larger than they really are. Like in a dream, the impossible unfolds before me, and yet I accept it unquestioningly. Beneath the water, I find myself in an altered state of consciousness, where the focus, range, and clarity of perception are dramatically changed.
Suddenly acutely aware that the octopuses she has met and come to love on her expeditions experience this dizzying otherworldliness as their basic backdrop of existence, she considers the limited array of sensations and perceptions that we've come to accept as the whole or reality:
The ocean, for me, is what LSD was to Timothy Leary. He claimed the hallucinogen is to reality what a microscope is to biology, affording a perception of reality that was not before accessible. Shamans and seekers eat mushrooms, drink potions, lick toads, inhale smoke, and snort snuff to transport their minds to realms they cannot normally experience.
[…]
In my scuba-induced altered state, I'm not in the grip of a drug: I am lucid in my immersion, voluntarily becoming part of what feels like the ocean's own dream.
Out of this perspective-shifting consideration arises Montgomery's most profound inquiry. Sitting in a Tahitian temple dedicated to the spirit of the octopus, where one of her expeditions has taken her, she wonders:
What is the soul? Some say it is the self, the "I" that inhabits the body; without the soul, the body is like a lightbulb with no electricity. But it is more than the engine of life, say others; it is what gives life meaning and purpose. Soul is the fingerprint of God.
Others say that soul is our innermost being, the thing that gives us our senses, our intelligence, our emotions, our desires, our will, our personality, and identity. One calls soul "the indwelling consciousness that watches the mind come and go, that watches the world pass." Perhaps none of these definitions is true. Perhaps all of them are. But I am certain of one thing as I sit in my pew: If I have a soul — and I think I do — an octopus has a soul, too.
The Soul of an Octopus is an astoundingly beautiful read in its entirety, at once scientifically illuminating and deeply poetic, and is indeed a worthy addition to the best science books of the year.
You can listen to the complete Science Friday segment below:

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