Monday, March 23, 2015

RUN LIKE A GIRL

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Malinda Frevert, EMILY's List" <information@emilyslist.org>
Date: Mar 23, 2015 1:29 PM
Subject: Snapped this on my walk to work
To: "Terry Travers" <trrytrvrs@gmail.com>

Emily's List
 
   

I saw the best thing on my walk to work the other day, Terry:

It's always a great surprise to spot EMILY's List support out in the wild. Sure, the stickers look amazing. But seeing one on a random car is also a powerful reminder that there are literally millions of us — young and old, women, men, students, teachers, lawyers, retirees — supporting pro-choice Democratic women. And we are all so excited to put one of them in the White House.

Actually, the whole team here at EMILY's List is excited about that, so we're printing a brand new sticker to mark the occasion. Can you help us pick the final design for our 2016 presidential bumper sticker? Vote now, and reserve the winner!

Thanks for showing your support!

Malinda Frevert
Digital Content Manager, EMILY's List

 




 

 

 

 
 
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We ignite change by getting pro-choice Democratic women elected to office.

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Wednesday, March 18, 2015

THE COMMITMENTS (1991)

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "2,500 Movies Challenge" <noreply+feedproxy@google.com>
Date: Mar 18, 2015 4:24 PM
Subject: Dave's 2,500 Movies Challenge
To: <trrytrvrs@gmail.com>

Dave's 2,500 Movies Challenge


#1,674. The Commitments (1991)

Posted: 17 Mar 2015 08:59 PM PDT


Directed By: Alan Parker

Starring: Robert Arkins, Michael Aherne, Angeline Ball




Tag line: "They Had Absolutely Nothing. But They Were Willing To Risk It All"

Trivia: Alan Parker originally wanted Van Morrison for the role of Joey "The Lips" Fagan






Looking to put together a band that specializes in soul music, manager wannabe Jimmy Rabbitte, Jr. (Robert Arkins) begins a search for the best musicians in all of Dublin. Starting with his good friends, guitarist Outspan Foster (Glen Hansard) and bass player Derek Scully (Kenneth McCluskey), he adds saxophonist Dean Fay (Félim Gormley), drummer Billy Mooney (Dick Massey), part-time pianist and full-time medical student Steve Clifford (Michael Aherne), and lead singer Declan "Deco" Cuffe (Andrew Strong). Rounding out the band are three pretty back-up singers: Natalie (Maria Doyle), Bernie (Bronagh Gallagher) and Imelda (Angeline Ball), as well as middle-aged trumpeter Joey "The Lips" Fagan (Johnny Murphy), who claims to have shared the stage with such legendary performers as Otis Redding, Wilson Pickett, and Sam Cooke (among others). Whether he's telling the truth or not, Joey is clearly the most experienced musician of the group, and it's he who comes up with the band's name: The Commitments.

After securing equipment (from some shady characters), a place to practice (the top floor of a billiard room), and even a bodyguard (the volatile Mickah, played by Dave Finnegan), Rabbitte pushes The Commitments to learn such classic songs as "Mustang Sally" and "The Dark End of the Street". Before long, they're playing gigs throughout Dublin, mostly to packed houses, but will in-fighting among the band's members ultimately ruin any chance they might have at achieving greatness?

Since its release in 1991, Alan Parker's The Commitments has proven to be a very popular film. In 1996, several characters from the movie were featured on an Irish postage stamp (part of the "Centenary of Irish Cinema" collection), and in a 2005 poll sponsored by Jameson's Whiskey, it was named the Best Irish Film of All-Time. Part of its appeal is the young cast that Parker assembled, almost all of whom had never acted in a movie before. Robert Arkins is extremely likable as Jimmy Rabbitte, Jr., the creative force behind The Commitments, and Johnny Murphy (one of the picture's most experienced actors) gives a solid performance as the God-fearing trumpet player Joey Fagan, whose stories fascinate both Rabbitte and his father, Jimmy Sr. (Colm Meaney), a lifelong Elvis fan (Fagan tells the two about his brief stay in Graceland as Elvis' guest). By the time it's over, we like every member of The Commitments; even the often arrogant lead singer "Deco", who lets the little bit of fame he achieves go straight to his head. It's fun watching this collection of ragtag musicians come together as a group, and even when they're at each others' throats (which happens quite often), we can't help but root for them to succeed.

Another reason The Commitments continues to resonate with viewers almost 25 years later is the music. While the performances are good, the actors and actresses that make up the band were chosen mostly for their musical prowess, which shines brightly each and every time they take the stage. Bolstered by Andrew Strong's deep, soulful voice (which, considering he was only 16 when the movie was shot, is kind of amazing), The Commitments do justice to every classic they perform. Their rendition of "Mustang Sally" is spot-on, as is the band's take on "Try a Little Tenderness" and "Slip Away". Even the ladies get in on the act (one of my favorite numbers is "I Never Loved a Man (The Way I Love You)", sung by Maria Doyle), and it's to everyone's credit that there isn't a bad tune in the bunch.

With great music, likable characters, and a gritty urban setting (which takes us to areas of Dublin I'm sure the city's tourism council would rather forget about), The Commitments is a movie that, as long as there are dreamers, will always be timeless.







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Sunday, March 15, 2015

New Reviews at RogerEbert.com for the week of March 13, 2015

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Ebert Digital" <newsletter@ebertdigital.com>
Date: Mar 13, 2015 11:04 AM
Subject: New Reviews at RogerEbert.com for the week of March 13, 2015
To: <trrytrvrs@gmail.com>

This is your weekly update of new reviews on RogerEbert.com, the world's preeminent destination for movie criticism, commentary and community.

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Life Itself, the acclaimed movie about Roger Ebert, is now available on Blu-ray. Click here to get your copy.

New Reviews at RogerEbert.com for the week of March 13, 2015

Here are reviews of this week's newest movies from RogerEbert.com. For these and more, including blog posts on everything from sci-fi and low-brow comedy to forgotten masterpieces of cinema, please visit our site and join the conversation.

Run All Night Poster

Run All Night

Review by Brian Tallerico

Action star Liam Neeson and director Jaume Collet-Serra have crafted their most satisfying work to date by sticking to a tried-and-true crime movie template, and allowing a talented cast and tight production values to be the only high concept they…

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It Follows Poster

It Follows

Review by Simon Abrams

It Follows both prolongs and heightens the potency of high school-age fears until they appear to be ancient existential terrors.

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Cinderella Poster

Cinderella

Review by Susan Wloszczyna

Whether it's Dante Ferretti's sumptuous production designs in refreshing spring-like hues or Sandy Powell's eye-popping if anachronistic costumes, Cinderella offers an array of lavishly frosted eye pastry at every turn.

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Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief Poster

Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief

Review by Brian Tallerico

That Gibney doesn't quite get all the answers to his questions isn't as material as it might be for other films. He's tackling them as no one else could.

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Seymour: An Introduction Poster

Seymour: An Introduction

Review by Glenn Kenny

The movie kind of flits along pleasantly and informatively enough without ever lifting off until the last fifteen minutes or so.

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Champs Poster

Champs

Review by Odie Henderson

Champs is a documentary that wants to say something sociological about the sweet science of boxing. It's like a thesis whose next draft would be destined for greatness.

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The Cobbler Poster

The Cobbler

Review by Brian Tallerico

If one subscribes to the theory that you can learn as much from a bad movie as from a good one, this one's a master class in what not to do.

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Cymbeline Poster

Cymbeline

Review by Peter Sobczynski

This is not one of the Bard's more frequently revived efforts and after watching Michael Almereyda's modern-day take on it, I can understand why.

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Home Sweet Hell Poster

Home Sweet Hell

Review by Sheila O'Malley

It's wretched.

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The Wrecking Crew Poster

The Wrecking Crew

Review by Christy Lemire

The Wrecking Crew is mostly about uplift, however—almost monotonously so.

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The Lovers Poster

The Lovers

Review by Glenn Kenny

Not to get too inside-baseball, but sometimes there's a very good reason that certain movies get stealthy on-demand releases during what industry members frequently refer to as "dumping season."

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3 Hearts Poster

3 Hearts

Review by Godfrey Cheshire

A curious, ultimately unsatisfying romantic comedy about two sisters in love with the same man.

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Treading Water Poster

Treading Water

Review by Sheila O'Malley

The movie doesn't quite hold together at times, and some of the darker elements (like what it feels like to be shamed and shunned at every moment of your life) are soft-pedaled. But it has a strange charm nonetheless.

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